Four men, each named Daniel Read Anthony. Four generations, each one made a difference in this world, especially in Leavenworth.


Four men, each named Daniel Read Anthony. Four generations, each one made a difference in this world, especially in Leavenworth.
The first was Col. Daniel R, Anthony, brother of Susan Brownell Anthony, and ending with Daniel R. Anthony IV, who died much too young in a plane crash.
My husband J.H. Johnston III worked for and with D.R. III and IV.
Johnny wrote in his first book, “Leavenworth Beginning to Bicentennial”: “Brother and sister, Daniel Read Anthony and Susan B. Anthony influenced the course of events in the state and nation, the Colonel through his newspaper and through his military career, and Miss Anthony as an early champion of woman suffrage.”
Four generations of Anthonys were associated with news papering in Leavenworth, beginning with Colonel Anthony’s Daily Conservative, which he founded in January 1861.  At that time Leavenworth was the western terminus of the telegraph.
When news of Kansas’s statehood was received on Jan. 29, 1861, a special report was printed and Anthony rode 32 miles on horseback to inform the territorial legislature at Lawrence.
An editor on the frontier possessed of convictions sometimes was called to defend himself.
On one occasion Anthony heard that a Confederate flag was being kept at Iatan, Platte County, Mo.
 Anthony and another man found the flag and the colonel announced his intention of taking it.
A number of Southern sympathizers drew their pistols and under the circumstances the visitors withdrew.
Anthony wrote of the details in his paper, and a rival publisher, R.C. Satterlee, suggested in the Kansas Herald that Anthony was a coward.
When the two met on the street Satterlee refused Anthony’s demand of retraction.
 Shots were exchanged and Satterlee was mortally wounded.
A jury acquitted the colonel.
Anthony helped form the Seventh Kansas Cavalry, and was commissioned a lieutenant colonel and commanded a brigade in Tennessee during the Civil War.
 In 1875 Anthony was unanimously elected first president of the Kansas State Historical Society.
Another incident involved the colonel and William Embry, who was the editor of the Daily Appeal.
Anthony had entered the Leavenworth Opera House, where Embry fired at him, inflicting a severe wound.
For a time it was thought the colonel would die, but he survived the attack and lived to the age of 80, dying of natural causes in 1904.
Col. Anthony had acquired the Leavenworth Times in 1871.
The Times was consolidated with the Conservative, the Bulletin and the Commercial, all rival 19th Century newspapers.
Also consolidated were the Evening Standard and Chronicle Tribune in 1903.
The Leavenworth Post was absorbed in 1923.
Col. Anthony made his Leavenworth home on the north Esplanade.
His sister, Susan visited him there on several occasions.
Another memorable visitor was Chief Joseph of the Nes Perce Tribe who were kept prisoners at the Fort.
D. R. Anthony Jr. was for a time U.S. Congressman Anthony, and also Mayor Anthony.
His father, Col. D. R. Anthony was mayor of Leavenworth also.
D. R. III, lived in the house at the southwest corner of Broadway and Ottawa.
For a time, D. R. IV lived next door to the south, later building a home on Westwood Drive.
He and his wife ‘Frannie’ had four children, alas, all girls.
Dan Anthony III gave Havens Park to the city, the name coming from his mother’s maiden name.
However, the Times was not always owned by the Anthony Family.
H. Miles Moore, in his book “Early History of Leavenworth City and County,” reported “The next paper published here, if we mistake not, was the Weekly Times, which was started in the summer of 1857, owned first by a stock company, and edited by Judge Robert Crozier.
It then passed into the hands of Vaughan & Bartlett, and edited, in part by David Baily, Esq,; afterwards by old Col. J. C Vaughan and his son, Gen. Champion Vaughan.
The first number of the Daily Times was issued Feb. 15, 1865. Its late editor and proprietor was Col. D. R. Anthony, a man of indomitable energy and pluck.
After Col Anthony’s death the paper passed to his son, D. R. Anthony Jr., and is, without doubt, the ablest, as it is the leading, Republican paper in the state.”
D. R. Anthony Jr. was for a time U.S. Congressman Anthony, and also Mayor Anthony: his father, Col. D. R. Anthony was mayor of Leavenworth also.
“Judge Crozier was probably as well known to the people of the city and county as any man in this bailiwick, on account of the various positions he held.
He came here early in 1857 and was for some time editor of the Leavenworth Times newspaper.
He was elected a member of the Council from this county to the first Free State Legislature in the fall of 1857.
He continued to act as editor of the Times for some time afterwards.

Annie Johnston is a Leavenworth resident and she is the wife of the late J.H. Johnston III, former Times publisher.