Just as the city of Leavenworth has been bracing for a flood predicted as a result of rainfall, melting snowpack and record dam openings up river, the city of Lansing also, is preparing for the Missouri River to swell beyond its banks.

 


Just as the city of Leavenworth has been bracing for a flood predicted as a result of rainfall, melting snowpack and record dam openings up river, the city of Lansing also, is preparing for the Missouri River to swell beyond its banks.

City of Lansing staff and Leavenworth County Fire District No. 1 have established plans for protecting property in northeast Lansing that is threatened by potential rising water in the next few days and weeks.

Based on the Corps of Engineers’ latest information, city staff at this time predicts a worst case scenario in which rising waters would threaten one residence, that of Raymond Jackson on Kansas Highway 5. Concrete blocks were delivered to Jackson’s property on Thursday afternoon. The blocks and sandbags were put in position on Friday.

According to eyewitness reports in 1993, this residence suffered major damage during that historic flood event.

Although projected flood scenarios at this time show the Lansing Wastewater Treatment facility is not in danger of flooding, staff has asked the facility’s consulting engineer to conduct a walk-through of the site to prepare for any possible situation.

For more information, contact Lansing Public Works Director John Young at 913-727-2400.

Preparations are also being made to prepare the city’s Wastewater Treatment facility for rising water levels from Seven-Mile and Nine-Mile creeks. Early preparations include building a sandbag wall around the main influent pump station to prevent flood waters from entering the structure, as well as protect the electrical controls for the pumps and grinders. A four-inch trash pump will be installed to pump any water that seeps through the wall.

Staff removed the six ultraviolet disinfection modules from the channels Monday. The predicted water elevation may inundate the modules, so staff will monitor the water level and ensure they are replaced as conditions allow. Access to the building will be affected, so actions must be taken to protect sensitive electronics equipment.

All biosolids processed are now being hauled to Deffenbaugh Industries for disposal.

For more information, contact Tony Zell or Gordon Cunning at the Lansing Wastewater Facility at 913-727-2206.