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The Leavenworth Times - Leavenworth, KS
  • County certifies election results

  • Leavenworth County Commissioners serving as the county’s board of canvassers Thursday certified the results of last week’s general election after reviewing poll books and provisional ballots.
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  • Leavenworth County Commissioners serving as the county’s board of canvassers Thursday certified the results of last week’s general election after reviewing poll books and provisional ballots. Commissioners John Flower and Bob Holland made up the board, along with the commission’s executive secretary Leigh Oliver, a stand-in for Commissioner Clyde Graeber. Graeber recused himself from the process because he was on the ballot in the election. In canvassing, County Clerk Janet Klasinski said the number of names in the poll books are checked against the ballots themeselves and the canvassers must review the provisional ballots cast by voters — those ballots given to voters who do not meet all of the conditions for otherwise casting a ballot. “The provisional ballots, we recommend to the board whether to qualify,” she said. “There are a set of standards set out through the secretary of state’s office through statute that indicate reasons we would qualify or not qualify.” Reasons for election workers to require a provisional ballot include a discrepancy between the stated address on voter registration information and a voters’ current address, a voter going to the wrong polling place to vote or, more recently, a voter refusing to show or lacking required photo identification. Klasinski said there were two of those last variety. “One individual did not agree with the law,” she said, referring to Kansas’ Secure and Fair Elections Act that requires voters present photo identification at the polls. The other voter who did not have photo ID was an older man, Klasinski said, and he did not present ID at the clerk’s office before the 9 a.m. Thursday deadline. A total of 881 provisional ballots were cast, she said, less than the 1,225 reported immediately after the election. Klasinski said that earlier figure had been the result of a mistake in her office. Of those, she said 477 were “fully qualified,” meaning all of the votes would be valid. Another 69 were considered “partially qualified,” according to Klasinski, meaning only a portion of those votes — for president and vice president, as well as U.S. Representative and countywide offices — would be counted. “The majority of the ones that we are not qualifying is because they were not previously registered in Leavenworth County,” she said, adding that state law bars local election officials from counting such ballots. Margins of victory were such that no results changed in the final count, though the turnout did increase, from 62.5 percent to 63.68.

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