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The Leavenworth Times - Leavenworth, KS
Political opinion, usually from the right.
Finally! TV Commercials to Get Quieter
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About this blog
By William Dameron

Retired computer consultant.  Not totally happy with our present administration.

Author of historical and science fiction novels.  

Author page at http://asmwizard.com/home/my-published-works/

To correct ...

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Right-Perspective

Retired computer consultant.  Not totally happy with our present administration.

Author of historical and science fiction novels.  

Author page at http://asmwizard.com/home/my-published-works/

To correct Lincoln somewhat, he should have said, \x34. . . that government of the people, by the politicians, and for the politicians shall not perish from the earth.

Government's view of the economy: If it moves, tax it.  If it keeps moving, regulate it.  And if it stops moving, subsidize it.  — Ronald Reagan

In the United States, the majority undertakes to supply a multitude of ready-made opinions for the use of individuals, who are thus relieved from the necessity of forming opinions of their own.
-- Alexis de Toqueville

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By TV Guide
Dec. 13, 2012 6 p.m.


Nicole Kidman | Photo Credits: Chris Jackson/Getty Images
Say goodbye to those obnoxiously loud television commercials! Starting Thursday at midnight, commercials will legally have be within two decibels of the programming during which they air.According to Today, 2 db isn't just a random number. Joe Addalia, Hearst Televison's director of technology projects, provided research that suggests that anything louder than 2 decibels is "the difference between viewers reaching for the remote and not."Has your favorite show been canceled?Though there have always been volume limits on programming set by stations, the upper limit was set to accommodate peak sounds such as a gunshot.  Before the implementation of the new law, called the Commercial Advertisement Loudness Mitigation Act (CALM), advertisers tended to air entire commercials at the peak level.Joel Kelsey, legislative director for Free Press, explained the need for the CALM Act, stating that loud commercials "have consistently been one of the issues consumers are most energized to write the FCC about. They don't like being screamed at every time the program breaks to buy deodorant."Are you excited about quieter commercials?

View original Finally! TV Commercials to Get Quieter at TVGuide.com

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