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The Leavenworth Times - Leavenworth, KS
  • Fort Leavenworth family welcomes ‘blizzard baby’

  • Many heeded calls from public safety officials to stay in during Tuesday’s early morning snowstorm, where high-speed wind gusts combined with snowfall made for unfavorable travel conditions.
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  • Many heeded calls from public safety officials to stay in during Tuesday’s early morning snowstorm, where high-speed wind gusts combined with snowfall made for unfavorable travel conditions.
    Not Henry James Linneweber, though — he was ready to get out and see the world, choosing that night to be born.
    It came as a bit of a surprise to his parents, Tracey and Maj. Edward Linneweber, as they had to strike out from their home on Fort Leavenworth to the hospital in the beginning of the storm. Tracey said she was scheduled to be admitted to Overland Park Regional Medical Center Saturday to have her labor induced.
    “I didn’t see myself as a story in the making,” she said.
    In fact, Tracey said when she began to feel contractions Monday night, she chalked it up to Braxton-Hicks contractions, common in her three previous pregnancies but not an indication of labor.
    Tracey said she did finally convince herself that the contractions were real, just in time.
    “My water broke before we got off Fort Leavenworth,” she said. “And when my water broke with my third child, she was born 45 minutes later, so I knew that wasn’t enough time to get to Overland Park.”
    Luckily, Tracey said she and her husband Ed — an Army major currently enrolled at Fort Leavenworth’s Command and General Staff College — had done some homework beforehand, setting up a backup hospital and a sort of third option.
    “We had a backup plan — we researched giving birth in the car,” she said.
    Her previous experience with childbirth turned out to hold true — Henry was born 20 minutes after their 11 p.m. arrival at Cushing Memorial Hospital, weighing 6 pounds, 11 ounces, and measuring 19.5 inches. The birth itself might have been shorter, but “the nurses wouldn’t let me push,” Tracey joked.
    She said she thinks going into labor might actually have been a self-fulfilling prophecy because of the predictions of an intense winter storm. Still, Tracey said the experience will likely make for a story to tell Henry when he gets older.
    April Pendleton, nurse manager for perinatal and perioperative services at Cushing Memorial Hospital, said nights like Monday tend to be tense ones for the hospital, since they have to make sure that enough doctors and nurses can make it to work in the first place. It also happens to be when surprises come in.
    “We like to say there’s trends,” Pendleton said. “When there’s a full moon or when there’s a storm.”

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