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The Leavenworth Times - Leavenworth, KS
  • Letter: Bible not a good defense for rich

  • If I was to defend the rich, I would not mention the Bible, Christians or Jesus. Here is why.
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  • To the editor:
    If I was to defend the rich, I would not mention the Bible, Christians or Jesus. Here is why. When taxes are mentioned, Jesus pays them in Matthew 17:27, Jesus provided the temple tax of four drachmas for him and Peter.
    The kings and their sons were exempt from the tax, and so Jesus paid the tax so as not to offend those sons.
    Is money off-shore, using carried interest-capital gains gimmicks paying their fair share as Jesus did? Raising taxes is seen as stealing from the rich by some, but placing a post office box in a building in the Caymans to avoid paying tax is not?
    My question, are the rich exempt from taxes others pay? Should billionaire Warren Buffet pay less tax rate than his secretary? In Ecclesiastes 5:10, "Whoever loves money never has enough; whoever loves wealth is never satisfied with his income."
    CEO Fuld, Lehman Brothers, 2006 salary: $22.1million; $1.84 million a month; $61,389 a day which is more than I make in a year.
    In Matthew 19:23-24, "Then Jesus said to his disciples, 'I tell you the truth, it is hard for a rich man to enter the kingdom of heaven. Again I tell you, it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God."
    Why is that? Maybe it is the way money distorts the motives of man and money's power distorts character. For example, the mortgage crisis: a program to make it possible for the common person to own a home is morphed into a fraudulent mortgage machine denying good business practices. Ways are invented to hide the risks of known bad loans, diluted in mixed bonds and other derivatives. They knew what they were doing. And when the gamble lost, it is us, the taxpayer, who lost. Not the few rich who caused so many hardships on those that entrusted their retirements and savings to them. No, I don't think the Bible is the best defense of the travails and financial woes of the rich. Maybe "For the New Intellectual: The Philosophy of Ayn Rand" would be more appropriate.
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