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The Leavenworth Times - Leavenworth, KS
  • Lansing High School project on-time, on budget

  • One of the questions most frequently asked of the planners of the new Lansing High School might soon have an answer, architects said Monday.
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  • One of the questions most frequently asked of the planners of the new Lansing High School might soon have an answer, architects said Monday.
    According to Meg Warner, an architect on the project for Hollis and Miller, that question is about when dirt will start moving at the site of the new high school at 147th Street near 4-H Road. She said that day is getting closer.
    “We're out of the design phase for the most part, now it's down to how do things go together?” Warner said.
    Warner said the design team has been working with the city on some of the things the site will need before construction begins ― primarily developing plans to address sewer and road issues at the site. She said the architects did reach an agreement with Rural Water District No. 8 for water services at the new school.
    Warner said the team also made the decision to split the bids for the construction into two separate packages ― the first, which will be sent out mid-July and opened Aug. 8, will be primarily site preparation.
    “Late August, early September ― that's our goal to start moving dirt,” she said, following the approval of the bid for the first package.
    The second bid package would be the actual construction of the building and athletic fields and would be opened around Oct. 1. The plan to redesign the current high school into Lansing Middle School's new location would begin after the new high school documents are released.
    “This is still the schedule we've been operating on for the whole premise of the bond,” Warner said.
    She said the project is also on budget following an estimate from the designated construction manager for the project, McPherson Contractors.
    “We have had to make some changes to do that, but none of those changes have changed the program ― we're not taking off classrooms, we're not deleting things,” she said.
    Instead, Warner said the process has been more akin to repacking a suitcase ― not everything fits the first time, so the team has been tweaking the non-essential elements. For instance, she said the team decided to change a curved exterior wall into three straight-line segments for a cost savings of $300,000.
    The current estimate does, however, allow the district to build a zero-foot entry for the community pool and a high-wind shelter that could withstand up to 250-mile-per-hour winds, Warner said.

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