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The Leavenworth Times - Leavenworth, KS
  • FEMA changing floodplain maps

  • The Federal Emergency Management Agency's floodplain management maps for the city of Leavenworth are changing. And, there are a number of properties that could be affected, city officials said.
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  • The Federal Emergency Management Agency's floodplain management maps for the city of Leavenworth are changing. And, there are a number of properties that could be affected, city officials said.
    Public Works Director Mike McDonald reviewed the changes this past week with the Leavenworth City Commission.
    Maps already have been drawn up.
    "They're not final," McDonald said.
    There will be an appeal period, and final versions probably won't be released until next year.
    Changes in the maps could have an impact on flood insurance rates for local residents.
    "This map sets the rate you pay," McDonald said.
    FEMA has produced a Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map and Flood Insurance Study for the entire county, according to Tom Morey, state National Flood Insurance Program coordinator.
    But, McDonald's presentation to the commission focused only on the changes in the city of Leavenworth.
    Dave Griffith, Geographic Information System technician for the city, said there are 168 properties in the city that have been removed from floodplain areas in the new maps. There are 80 properties that have been moved into floodplains.
    McDonald said a few houses on properties that are now in floodplains may be directly impacted. In many cases, low spots of properties are in floodplains, but houses appear to be at proper elevations.
    McDonald said there's no requirement that the city have a public meeting about the maps, city officials think it's a good idea to have one.
    He said Commissioner Larry Dedeke suggested having more than one public meeting with one focusing on downtown properties.
    Mayor Laura Janas Gasbarre said she "absolutely" supports having public meetings, and she likes the idea of having one for downtown properties.
    McDonald said the city can identify the property owners who will be impacted by the map changes and invite them to public meetings.
    The public meetings may not be held until July.
    An formal appeal process likely will begin in June and last for 90 days.
     

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