It's not uncommon for judges outside of the Kansas Supreme Court to be called in from time to time to sit with the justices and hear cases, an official with the state's Office of Judicial Administration said.
So it will be next week in Topeka for David J. King, Leavenworth County District Court chief judge since 1991.

It's not uncommon for judges outside of the Kansas Supreme Court to be called in from time to time to sit with the justices and hear cases, an official with the state's Office of Judicial Administration said.
So it will be next week in Topeka for David J. King, Leavenworth County District Court chief judge since 1991.
"It's still a highlight of a judge's career to sit with the Supreme Court," said Lisa Taylor, Judicial Administration public information director.
King, a Leavenworth County District Court judge since 1986 and a former Leavenworth County assistant attorney, is slated to sit with justices Thursday and hear oral arguments in six cases.
Following arguments, King and the justices will deliberate and draft opinions.
Supreme Court arguments are webcast live through the "Watch Supreme Court Live" link in the right-hand column of the Kansas Judicial Branch website, www.kscourt.org.
Four of the six cases are criminal, and stem from Sedgwick and Rice counties. The fifth and sixth involve the temporary suspension of an attorney's law license.
A summary of the cases:
• State v. Quartez Brown, Sedgwick County: Brown was convicted of felony murder, second-degree murder, aggravated burglary, and aggravated assault, and was sentenced to a "hard-20 term."
Brown is appealing whether there was sufficient evidence to find him guilty of the charges.
• State v. Kevin L. Brown, Jr., Sedgwick County: Brown was convicted of felony murder, aggravated burglary, and aggravated assault. He was also sentenced to a "hard-20 term," with a consecutive 120-month term.
He is appealing whether the district court had jurisdiction to convict for felony murder and aggravated battery because he was not bound over for aggravated assault as the underlying element of aggravated burglary.
• State v. Kiara M. Williams, Sedgwick County: Williams was convicted of felony murder, aggravated burglary and aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. She was sentenced to a "hard-20 term."
She is appealing whether the trial court erred giving an instruction of sympathy and prejudice, whether the trial court abused its discretion, and whether defense counsel imposed a guilt-based defense by telling the jury Williams was morally and ethically wrong.
• State v. Allen R. Julian, Rice County: Julian was arrested for possession of marijuana, possession of a handgun, and no proof of insurance following a traffic stop. He moved to suppress all evidence seized as a result of the stop. The state appealed, and the Court of Appeals reversed and remanded the decision.
Issues the Supreme Court will consider are whether Julian's vehicle was in violation of his right to be free from unreasonable searches and seizures and whether the search was lawful.
• The matter of Miriam Rittmaster, attorney discipline: Actions in this case were consolidated by the Supreme Court. The case involves the attorney accepting a retainer in a domestic matter, but repeatedly failing to respond to her client's request for information, and her attempt to set aside a divorce decree.
The Kansas Rules of Professional Conduct recommended a six-month suspension from practicing law, with a reinstatement hearing at a later date.