A Kansas Department of Corrections official has responded to claims by a state union organization that violence has erupted at Lansing Correctional Facility.

A Kansas Department of Corrections official has responded to claims by a state union organization that violence has erupted at Lansing Correctional Facility.

KDOC Communications Director Jeremy Barclay confirmed there were three incidents last week involving inmates that resulted in injuries to correctional officers. But, he said the injuries were not serious.

"They were minor incidents," he said.

On Thursday, the Kansas Organization of State Employees issued a news release expressing "extreme concern" following what the organization characterized as erupting violence at the state prison in Lansing.

The news released reported there had been five incidents between June 5 and June 9 involving inmates that resulted injuries to 10 correctional officers. The release reported that some of the injuries were severe.

Barclay disputes the number of incidents reported by KOSE.

He said there were only three incidents that occurred on three consecutive days, June 6, 7 and 8.

He said six staff members were injured.

Barclay said KDOC officials take injuries to staff members seriously, and procedures were followed to have the LCF employees checked off site by medical professionals.

"None of the injuries required hospitalization," he said.

He said the incidents involved three inmates in different areas of the prison. The prison has more than 2,300 inmates.

Barclay said the three incidents are believed to be unrelated. He said each involved an inmate "acting out."

He said prison officials always conduct internal investigations of such incidents to determine what they can do better and take the necessary administrative action to deal with inmates.

He said none of the three incidents resulted in a lockdown at the prison.

The release from KOSE also reported LCF is understaffed by about 55 officers.

Barclay said LCF currently has 27 vacancies among its 509 uniformed officer positions. He said the prison has been using overtime to maintain normal staffing levels.

"We're working as always to fill those 27 (vacancies)," he said.

He said finding the right people for these positions is not always easy.