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The Leavenworth Times - Leavenworth, KS
  • Deputy chief: Pay attention to pedestrians

  • Dan Nicodemus said some drivers are careful to watch out for other cars, but don't always pay attention to pedestrians.
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    • Know the law:

      While a local law enforcement official said such incidents aren't common, a Leavenworth woman was injured Monday while walking in a crosswalk.


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      Know the law:

      While a local law enforcement official said such incidents aren't common, a Leavenworth woman was injured Monday while walking in a crosswalk.



      According to the law: "When traffic-control signals are not in place or not in operation, the driver of a vehicle shall yield the right-of-way, slowing down or stopping if need be to so yield, to a pedestrian entering or crossing the roadway within a crosswalk."

  • Dan Nicodemus said some drivers are careful to watch out for other cars, but don't always pay attention to pedestrians.
    "I think people are more used to looking for cars," the Leavenworth Police Department deputy chief said.
    He points to this as a cause of car-pedestrian incidents in crosswalks.
    Nicodemus said the city of Leavenworth doesn't have many incidents at crosswalks when compared to other types of crashes.
    But, a woman was injured Monday when she was hit by a car while walking in a crosswalk on South Third Street.
    That case was investigated by the Leavenworth County Sheriff's Office, and charges are pending against the driver, Undersheriff Jim Sherley said.
    Nicodemus said the tendency of drivers to look only for other cars also can result in crashes involving motorcyclists and bicyclists.
    Nicodemus said law requires drivers to "yield the right-of-way, slowing down or stopping if need be" to pedestrians who are entering or already walking in crosswalks.
    "Some people don't realize that a crosswalk doesn't have to be painted with lines," Nicodemus said.
    He said the space between sidewalks that are located at opposite ends of an intersection is considered a crosswalk even if it isn't marked as such.
    Nicodemus said police can ticket a driver for not stopping for people in crosswalks.
    "It's a moving violation," he said.
    In Leavenworth, the offense results in a $145 citation.
    The law also requires drivers "exercise due care to avoid colliding with any pedestrian" and give notice by honking their horns when necessary.
    Nicodemus said the law prohibits pedestrians from suddenly leaving a curb and walking into the path of a car that is so close that it would constitute an immediate hazard.
    "The best practice is to double check, to look and make sure you're safe," he said.
    He said this advice can extend to motorists. He said people may have a false sense of security when a light turns green. He said it's a good idea to check to make sure other motorists are obeying red lights at the intersection.
    Following Monday's incident on Third Street, the Sheriff's Office has set up a device in the area that records the speeds of passing vehicles.
    Sherley said the information can help determine if additional action such as increased enforcement or warnings to drivers is needed.
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