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The Leavenworth Times - Leavenworth, KS
  • EMS director: Calls rising, patient transports down

  • Call volume for Leavenworth County EMS is up compared to the same time last year.
    But, not all calls result in people being transported to the hospital.
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    • Other business

      In other business Thursday, the Leavenworth County Commission:


      • Approved a temporary special use permit to allow a tempora...

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      Other business

      In other business Thursday, the Leavenworth County Commission:



      • Approved a temporary special use permit to allow a temporary concrete plant at 20651 Edwards Dr. The temporary concrete plant will be used for a project on U.S. 73-Kansas 7 Highway in northern Leavenworth County.



      • Received a quarterly report about Leavenworth County Emergency Management from the department's director, Chuck Magaha.



      • Met in executive session for 27 minutes to discuss land acquisition. Commissioners also met in executive session for 10 minutes to discuss pending litigation.

  • Call volume for Leavenworth County EMS is up compared to the same time last year.
    But, not all calls result in people being transported to the hospital.
    That's something EMS Director Jamie Miller was asked about Thursday when he provided a quarterly report to the Leavenworth County Commission.
    Miller said EMS has had 4,699 calls so far this year. Patients were transported only 2,733 times.
    He said calls during the first quarter of 2014 were up by 6 percent compared to the same time the previous year.
    "We're responding to about 26 calls per day," he said.
    Miller said EMS has been transporting about 19 people per day.
    Commissioner Dennis Bixby said EMS is on track to have about 9,400 calls in 2014. But, it's on track to have 5,466 calls in which people are transported to the hospital.
    He asked what EMS personnel are doing during the calls in which people aren't transported.
    "Some (patients) are treated in place," Miller said.
    In some cases, patients have died at the scene. In other cases, people refuse to be transported.
    Miller said insurance companies have cracked down when it comes to ambulance services, and they may not cover EMS transports for some types of injuries such as a broken wrist.
    "The denials are up," he said.
    Miller said some patients decide not to take ambulance rides after they're informed they could be responsible for paying the bill.
    During his briefing, Miller suggested county officials may need to look at having additional response vehicles for EMS.
    "The statistics are showing that, supporting that," he said.
    Miller also informed commissioners that his department was inspected last month by the Kansas Board of Emergency Medical Services.
    He said the only problem found was the absence of a "no smoking" sticker in a vehicle. But, the problem was corrected before the inspector left.
    "I can't say that we're perfect this year unfortunately," he said.
    But, the department still received a 100 percent score.
    Miller, who also serves as Leavenworth County Health Department director, provided commissioners a quarterly briefing about that department as well.

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