It may not be the type of video games that most Americans are used to playing. But a new interactive game developed for the Army is designed to train command teams how to respond to reports of sexual harassment and sexual assault.

It may not be the type of video games that most Americans are used to playing. But a new interactive game developed for the Army is designed to train command teams how to respond to reports of sexual harassment and sexual assault.

ELITE SHARP CTT, which was developed with coordination from the Games for Training Program at Fort Leavenworth, was introduced for Army use at the beginning of this month.

Members of the Army can download the interactive game for free.

"It gives them a good overview of how to respond to sexual assault, sexual harassment incidents," said Maj. Greg Pavlichko, chief of the Games for Training Program.

The Games for Training Program is part of the National Simulation Center at Fort Leavenworth.

ELITE stands for Emergent Leader Immersive Training Environment. SHARP is an acronym for Sexual Harassment Assault Response and Prevention, and CTT stands for Command Team Trainer.

April is recognized as National Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month.

Pavlichko said the interactive game was developed for the Army by the Institute for Creative Technologies at the University of Southern California.

The SHARP Academy at Fort Leavenworth was one of the Army agencies that provided expertise for the program and helped validate the game's content.

Pavlichko said the game has three components. The first part is an instructional piece that features an animated character, Sgt. 1st Class Davis. The second component features animated vignettes demonstrating good and bad responses to situations. The final component includes scenarios in which users of the program interact with "virtual human" characters.

During the interactive portion, users have to choose the best responses from multiple choices. Pavlichko said the best answer may not be obvious.

"The answers are subtly different," he said.

Pavlichko said the body language of the virtual human characters will change if the user is not providing good responses.

Pavlichko acknowledged some of the language used in the program is colorful, but he said this makes the game realistic.

He said the game also includes a robust after action review which provides a score and allows users to review responses for each interaction.

Lt. Col. Jeff Bevington, chief of leader development, education and training for the SHARP Academy, said the game gives young command teams an idea of what are right and wrong responses.

"They need to know what to say to the victims," he said.

Pavlichko said the interactive game is a followup to an earlier version of an ELITE program that provides training for counseling soldiers.

Bevington said officials who have been involved with the ELITE SHARP CTT are now trying to get the word out about the new program.

"We are trying to educate the Army on this tool," Bevington said.

Twitter: @LVTNewsJohnR