While it was unclear Tuesday how many signatures had been collected, an organizer of an effort seeking to recall a county commissioner does not believe there are enough to trigger an election.

While it was unclear Tuesday how many signatures had been collected, an organizer of an effort seeking to recall a county commissioner does not believe there are enough to trigger an election.

“I really don’t think we’re anywhere near where we need to be,” Michael Jordan said.

Jordan was a member of a committee that sought to recall County Commission Chairman Bob Holland.

Organizers of the effort had 90 days to collect at least 2,012 signatures of registered voters in Holland’s district. Collecting this number of signatures would result in a recall election.

Tuesday was the deadline for turning in the signatures to the County Clerk’s Office.

Jordan said he planned to turn in the signatures he collected. But based on what he has heard from others who were circulating the recall petition, he believes they are well short of the needed number of signatures.

“I would be shocked if we got 500,” Jordan said.

As of 4 p.m. Tuesday, County Clerk Janet Klasinski said her office had not yet received any signatures for the recall effort.

Holland, a Republican, represents the County Commission’s 1st District, which includes most of northern Leavenworth County including a portion of the city of Leavenworth. He was re-elected to a second term on the commission in 2014.

In the fall, members of a committee submitted a written justification for why they were seeking to recall Holland. They argued Holland failed to perform his duties as a commissioner because of violations of the Kansas Open Meetings Act.

In September, the three county commissioners entered into a consent order agreement with the Kanas attorney general to resolve violations of the state’s open meetings law.

The Attorney General’s Office found the commissioners violated the Kansas Open Meetings Act in April by making binding decisions in executive session, not properly wording motions to go into executive session and not limiting discussion in executive session to topics identified in motions.

As part of the consent order, commissioners admitted to the violations. Each commissioner agreed to receive at least one hour of training regarding the open meetings law.

Jordan said he believes some people did not want to have anything to do with the recall petition because the 2016 election year was messy and nasty.

Holland was not on the ballot last year. But the two other commissioners were on the ballot. Commissioner Clyde Graeber won re-election. Commissioner Dennis Bixby lost in a primary, and he will be replaced by Doug Smith.

County Treasurer Janice Van Parys, who has had a contentious relationship with the County Commission, also was on the ballot in 2016. Van Parys was re-elected to the office of treasurer.

While he had not received official word Tuesday, Holland said he also had heard that the recall effort against him may be short of the needed number of signatures.

Holland said he wanted to thank people in the 1st District who have confidence in him.

Holland said commissioners are trying to move the county forward.

“I look forward to working with both county commissioners,” he said.

Twitter: @LVTNewsJohnR