The Leavenworth County Commission voted Monday to approve the replacement of 21 outdoor warning sirens.

The Leavenworth County Commission voted Monday to approve the replacement of 21 outdoor warning sirens.

The new sirens will cost $470,459.

Leavenworth County Emergency Management Director Chuck Magaha said the sirens being replaced date back to 1975.

“They’re very antiquated,” he said.

He said the sirens still work, but maintenance for them is no longer an option.

Magaha said his department basically has gone through all of the spare parts it has for the old sirens.

He said the county has more than 40 outdoor warning sirens. But about half of them were replaced between 2008 and 2012.

The purchased approved Monday will replace the remaining half.

Magaha said his department has $401,402 set aside for the new sirens through depreciation funds.

An additional $75,000 is being set aside for the sirens from money left over from a sales tax that expired at the end of 2016. The sales tax has been replaced by a new tax that will be in place for 20 years.

County Clerk Janet Klasinski said the county has about $400,000 left over from the old sales tax.

The new sirens will come from Federal Signal, an Illinois company. But the county will make the purchase through Blue Valley Public Safety, Grain Valley, Missouri.

Magaha said the county will not have to put the project out for bids. He said the sirens will be purchased using a Mid-America Regional Council procurement contract. Leavenworth County is a member of MARC.

Magaha said Blue Valley Public Safety will purchase 16 of the 21 sirens that are being replaced to use for spare parts.

The old sirens will be purchased for $1,250 each. Magaha said the compensation for the old sirens is reflected in the overall price quotation of $470,459 for the new sirens.

Other sirens being replaced will be scrapped for metal recycling.

Magaha said he has received a request from a museum in Tonganoxie, which wants to have one of the old sirens.

Magaha said he has been told it will take eight to 10 weeks before the first of the new sirens is installed.

Magaha said the new sirens are intended to only be heard by people who are outdoors.

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