A Basehor man has been sentenced to a year in jail and probation for involuntary manslaughter, according to a news release from a prosecution official.

A Basehor man has been sentenced to a year in jail and probation for involuntary manslaughter, according to a news release from a prosecution official.

William Wilson, 22, was sentenced Friday in Leavenworth County District Court.

A jury found him guilty last month of one count of involuntary manslaughter while driving under the influence of alcohol.

The charge stemmed from a crash that took place June 13, 2015, on 222nd Street near the Kansas River. The crash resulted in the death of two people.

Wilson was related to the two victims, Justin Wilson and Jesse Aldridge.

William Wilson reportedly drove a vehicle that veered off the road and struck a tree. The passengers, Justin Wilson and Aldrich, were ejected from the vehicle. They were pronounced dead at the scene, according a news release from County Attorney Todd Thompson.

It is believed William Wilson and the two men had left a drinking establishment around 2 or 3 a.m. When the crash was reported around 5 a.m., William Wilson was found to have a blood-alcohol level of .09.

The legal limit in Kansas for people who are 21 and older is .08. The legal limit for a driver who is less than 21 years old is .02.

William Wilson was 20 years old at the time of the crash and under the legal drinking age.

William Wilson and the two victims were scheduled to serve as groomsmen later that day at a wedding in Basehor, according to Thompson.

William Wilson’s attorney, James Colgan, argued Friday for a new trial. The attorney argued evidence in the case did not show that the defendant had been the driver at the time of the crash.

Assistant County Attorney Chris Scott argued the jury found there was enough evidence to show William Wilson had been the driver.

District Judge Gunnar Sundby ruled against the motion for new trial.

According to Thompson, friends and family members of Wilson spoke Friday of the character and hard work of Wilson. They asked that the defendant receive probation.

Forty-one months was considered the standard prison sentence in the case under the state sentencing guidelines.

The judge granted a departure from the prison sentence. He suspended the 41-month sentence, ordering the defendant to serve a year in jail and three years of probation.

Wilson will be able to participate in work release during his jail sentence, according to Thompson.