A Leavenworth County commissioner feels he should have received notification from the city of Leavenworth regarding the recent death of a man who was working at an industrial park site.

A Leavenworth County commissioner feels he should have received notification from the city of Leavenworth regarding the recent death of a man who was working at an industrial park site.

The 34-year-old man had been working at the site of a future business and technology park that will be located at Eisenhower Road and 14th Street.

He was found unresponsive in a vehicle July 20 following a lunch break. He was later pronounced dead at the hospital, according to a statement released by the man’s employer, Leavenworth Excavating and Equipment Company, or Lexeco as it is commonly called.

The city of Leavenworth owns the land where the industrial park is being developed. The city entered into an agreement with JMK Partners and Lexeco to develop the site for use as the business and technology park.

The total cost of the project is $9.7 million. The Leavenworth County government has provided $4.8 million in funding for the project. The city of Leavenworth is picking up the rest of the cost.

Bob Holland, who serves on the Leavenworth County Commission, said the city government should have reported the July 20 incident to the county government because the county is providing funding for the project.

Leavenworth City Manager Paul Kramer said city officials had not considered notifying the county government.

“We would treat that how we would any incident like that in the city whether it’s on a city street, on a city project or somewhere just within the city limits,” Kramer said. “It never occurred to us that because of how the project is funded that we would do something different.”

He said city officials normally would not notify anyone who was not directly involved.

Kramer said he has not received any request from the county government for that type of information in the future.

Holland has been critical of the Leavenworth business and technology park project.

On April 6, Holland joined his fellow county commissioners in approving an agreement with the city of Leavenworth. The agreement outlined how the project would be funded including the $4.8 million contribution from the county.

At the time, Holland acknowledged having concerns. But Holland indicated he might discuss those concerns at a later time.

On April 20, Holland voted against a request for proposals document that had been prepared by the city of Leavenworth for the project. The other two commissioners voted for it.

Holland first brought up the July 20 incident during an Aug. 3 meeting of the County Commission.

At that time, Holland said, “I think it is preventable if people know about it. People can just use common sense.”

Holland said Monday that his earlier comments were based on information he heard indicating the employee had chest pains. He argued that it would be common sense to take a person with chest pains to the hospital.

Lexeco has launched an investigation to determine the cause of the employee’s death. Autopsy results have not been made available, according to the statement from Lexeco.

Greg Kaaz, president of Lexeco, said the company notified the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration on July 20 following the employee’s death.

He said a federal safety inspector met with officials of Lexeco and Leavenworth County EMS, but OSHA has not taken action before the cause of death is determined.

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