U.S. Air Force Second Lieutenant Jordan A. Boyce of Leavenworth, recently graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Geospatial Sciences. In this Q5, he talks about his hope to be a pilot.

U.S. Air Force Second Lieutenant Jordan A. Boyce of Leavenworth, recently graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Geospatial Sciences. In this Q5, he talks about his hope to be a pilot.

1. Jordan, as a very recent graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy, what are your goals as you report to Vance Air Force Base to begin pilot training?
Is it too honest to say 'finish pilot training'? At this early point in my career I'm just trying to be the best officer I can be, so proving myself in UPT is critical to that. My goal is to fly either F-15Es of F-35s, so I have a lot of exciting training ahead of me in order to achieve that goal.

2. Did you know during your years at Leavenworth High School that you wanted to pursue a life in the Air Force? Have other members of your family served in the military?
At the beginning, not one bit. Although my dad was in the Army, I had never really been interested in the military. It wasn't untill sophomore year when I started trying to figure out where I wanted to go to college, and how to pay for it, that I got a letter from the Academy. I had always been interested in flying and the military had given my family a good life, so I went out to Colorado before my senior year for the Academy's summer seminar program to see if I liked it. Five years later, the rest is history.

3. How best will your degree in geospatial sciences help you when you become a pilot and do you plan to someday become a commercial airline pilot?
I could probably fill an entire page answering this question, but I'll just say this: Geo is about "the why of where." It isn't enough to just go into battle with guns drawn- you have to understand how to get there while observing international laws and sovereignty, what the terrain is like both at your objective and on the way, how the weather will affect the mission, what buildings you can't target and where they are, as well as a host of other things. Being able to understand where things are in relation to each other and why they're there not only helps when you're just learning to fly a plane, but when you're in combat and lives are at stake, and my work as a Geo major has definitely prepared me well for it. Right now I have no desire to become a commercial pilot. I thing intelligence work or politics would be cool post-Air Force, but right now I'm just taking it a step at a time.

4. Has going to school in a military community helped you transition from high school to military service and did your experience as an Eagle Scout help you in many ways?
I really credit the overall diversity we have in our community in helping me at USAFA. There are people of many different backgrounds and experiences at Leavenworth High School just as there are in the Air Force, so experiencing those differences early on made me more confident. My experiences through scouting gave me both a sense of independence, from camping and a foundation of what good character is. Plus, the outdoor activities and hiking in Colorado are amazing, so having that sense of adventure and all of those Scout skills come in handy.

5. What are you most looking forward to as you embark upon this exciting and challenging chapter in your life?
More than anything I'm looking forward to next November when I'll finally pin on my wings and officially become an Air Force pilot.

— Rimsie McConiga