With warmer than normal temperatures for this time of year, some people may want to take the opportunity to burn leaves and other brush around their properties.

With warmer than normal temperatures for this time of year, some people may want to take the opportunity to burn leaves and other brush around their properties.

But the area has been experiencing a high risk for grass fires. And this is likely to continue through the winter, according to Chuck Magaha, director of Leavenworth County Emergency Management.

With a lack of rain in recent weeks, vegetation in the area is dying a lot faster this fall. And as the wind picks up, the fire danger increases.

Magaha said vegetation in the county will not “green up” anytime soon. He said the county may experience an increased risk of grass fires until mid-April.

He said the area has had only about one-quarter of an inch of rain in the last 40 days.

In unincorporated areas of the county, burn permits are issued through the Leavenworth County Sheriff’s Office.

No burn permits were issued Monday because the fire danger was considered to be very high. Permits were being issued Tuesday for most areas of the county, but there was still a high fire danger.

“If you have to do open burning, use extreme caution when doing it,” Magaha said.

He said people first need to obtain burn permits. They also should wear proper attire, such as cotton clothing, eye protection, gloves and leather boots. He said people also need to make sure they have a water supply available.

He said people should stay with a fire until it is out. And they should not hesitate to call 911 if they ever feel a fire is getting away from them.

Magaha said the best way to control a fire is by burning in a container with a lid.

He said people also need to properly dispose of smoking materials to help prevent fires.

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