When they met Thursday, Leavenworth County commissioners agreed they no longer need a county-owned vehicle that is designated for their use.

When they met Thursday, Leavenworth County commissioners agreed they no longer need a county-owned vehicle that is designated for their use.

Commissioners voted 2-0 to declare a 2006 Ford Taurus that previously has been used by commissioners as surplus equipment. Commissioner Bob Holland was absent.

The county will continue to reimburse commissioners for their mileage for travel in their own vehicles that is related to their duties.

County Administrator Mark Loughry said the Taurus has about 50,000 miles on its odometer. He said the vehicle was used last year for trips that totaled about 1,000 miles.

“We have another use for it,” he said.

He said the County Attorney’s Office has a need for a vehicle for an investigator.

Loughry said the car recently was damaged in an accident and the repairs would cost $2,200.

“We do have a $1,000 deductible,” Loughry said.

When asked about who had the accident, Loughry said one of the commissioners was driving the vehicle at the time of the wreck.

Commission Chairman Doug Smith and Commissioner Louis Klemp indicated they were not involved in the accident.

Even if the car is used by the County Attorney’s Office, Loughry said he does not intend to have the repairs made.

“It’s drivable,” he said.

Klemp questioned the need for the County Attorney’s Office to use the vehicle.

“Personal opinion, I say we just get rid of the vehicle,” Klemp said.

Smith said he supported transferring the car to the County Attorney’s Office. He said the county government has not yet evolved to the point of creating a motor pool from which departments can check out vehicles.

Loughry said the County Attorney’s Office had justified the need for a vehicle earlier this year during budget time. Loughry said he suggested to the County Attorney’s Office that a surplus vehicle from the county could be used for this purpose.

Klemp made a motion to get rid of the vehicle by selling it through an online auction service.

Smith seconded the motion for purposes of continued discussion.

Smith said he sees the transfer of the vehicle to the County Attorney’s Office as a good use of taxpayer money because the County Attorney’s Office will not be purchasing a new car.

“They’re going to end up with a vehicle,” Smith said.

Klemp’s motion failed. Neither he nor Smith voted for it.

Smith then made a motion to declare the car surplus equipment. This motion passed.

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