The Ephraim Basehor chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution recently honored several local students who submitted exemplary essays as part of a yearly contest sponsored by the organization.

The Ephraim Basehor chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution recently honored several local students who submitted exemplary essays as part of a yearly contest sponsored by the organization. Divided by grade level, three winning entries were read to members of the DAR and family members at the event held last week at Basehor’s VFW Post 11499.

Abigail Fisher’s winning essay was a first-person account of a teacher during the final days of World War I. The teacher experienced the trials and tribulations of life just scraping by while the men were away fighting for their lives. The theme was about the teacher finding her purpose in a time of war.

High school student Monika Hoffman’s essay focused on Christopher Columbus and what convinced the Spanish monarchy to support the Italian explorer instead of a Spanish explorer. Hoffman’s entry discussed the blending of cultures.

Both essays won their respective divisions at the local DAR chapter level and will now advance to the state DAR competition. Both winners received a certificate as well as a monetary award.

The Good Citizen Program had perhaps the most intense requirements. The entrants were required to describe how they exhibit dependency, service, leadership and patriotism traits in their everyday life. Teachers must also endorse the nominee. In addition, the nominee must submit a grade report, an essay and two additional letters of recommendation.

The final part of the submission involved being sequestered in a room with a DAR representative for two hours to write on a topic that is revealed once the door is opened. Winner Sierra Staatz’s winning essay topic was how America has advanced freedom around the world.

Staatz’s entry and credentials are now being forwarded to compete against other entries for a $2,500 DAR national scholarship.

The Daughters of the American Revolution organization has objectives of God, home, country and community involvement by women who can trace their family heritage directly back to a person involved in the United States’ efforts toward independence.

Beth Kornegay is a freelance writer covering news and events in the city of Basehor. If you have a story idea, email her at gabi_kansas@yahoo.com