Jerald Gross is the eighth-grade Social Studies instructor at Richard W. Warren Middle School. In this Q5, he talks about the Civil War exhibit being shown at the school.

Jerald Gross is the eighth-grade Social Studies instructor at Richard W. Warren Middle School. In this Q5, he talks about the Civil War exhibit being shown at the school.

Jerald, What are some of the documents and artifacts that are part of the Civil War exhibit at Warren Middle School? What sort of reactions have you observed from students when viewing these objects from this turbulent period?
Some of the documents include a Union Draft Notice dated Sept. 10, 1863; a lithograph of the Battle at Willow's Creek, Missouri, near Fort Leavenworth, and a letter from the Fort Leavenworth Ordinance Department dated Dec. 31, 1864, requesting any ordinance be returned.
Artifacts  include uniform buttons; a Confederate $5 bill; drummer boy boots; knives; bullets; belt buckles; a pair of glasses circa 1863 Quantrill's Raid in Lawrence, Kansas; and a Civil War surgeon's amputation saw for cutting arms and legs.   Students have used the display to continue discussions on the lessons from the classroom.   One student was observed telling another student, "Imagine getting your  arm or leg cut off with that saw."

What areas and sites throughout the country are they from and are most of them in museums or privately owned?
While the artifacts are from multiple areas of the Civil War era, there are bullets from the Battle of St. Petersburg, Virginia;   the Battle of Murfreesboro, Tennessee; and the Battle  of Jonesborough, Georgia.

Who organized and installed the artifacts? What partnership made it possible?
The artifacts were organized and installed  by a collector who wishes to remain anonymous whom I have known for almost 15 years.
These artifacts are from his private collection and he wants the collection to stand on its own and be less about him.

What is the Kansas City Military Collectors Club’s goal in sending these artifacts out for students to see and learn about?
The Kansas City Military Collectors Club's goal is to create new friendships and encourage shared learning in the various fields of military history.

As an eighth-grade social studies teacher, what are you hoping students will learn from viewing the artifacts from this war?
I hope that students will be able to view and tie these artifacts to our lessons and use them as a springboard into further historical inquiry.   
Contrary to belief, history is fun and not boring.   
As my students learned from the first days of school this year, Learn from history or be condemned to repeat it.

— Rimsie McConiga