Rural Leavenworth County residents soon could receive letters to remind them about a county government rule that requires them to have their address numbers posted on mailboxes or other signs.

Rural Leavenworth County residents soon could receive letters to remind them about a county government rule that requires them to have their address numbers posted on mailboxes or other signs.

Jeff Culbertson, director of the county’s Geographic Information Systems Department, raised the issue Tuesday while providing a quarterly report to the Leavenworth County Commission.

Culbertson said some residences in rural areas of the county do not have their addresses properly posted.

He said this can create a problem for law enforcement officers, firefighters or EMS personnel who are looking for a particular address in an emergency.

“Emergency responders aren't going to be able to find them if they're not marked,” Culbertson said.

In 1989, the county enacted a rule requiring residents in unincorporated areas of the county to have their addresses posted on mailboxes or other permanent signage.

Commission Chairman Louis Klemp questioned Tuesday whether all rural county residences have mailboxes.

Culbertson said some residents use post office boxes and do not have mailboxes at their homes. And in some cases, residents share a mailbox for more than one home.

Culbertson estimated that about 1,200 residences may not have addresses properly marked.

He initially said that he was working with Jeff Joseph, director of planning and zoning, to notify these property owners.

But Culbertson said after Tuesday's meeting that letters may be sent to all rural Leavenworth County residences to remind them of the requirement.

“We're just going to send a letter to everybody,” he said.

He said the letters may be mailed next month.

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