Testimony got under way Tuesday in the trial of a woman accused of murdering her estranged husband in Leavenworth.

Testimony got under way Tuesday in the trial of a woman accused of murdering her estranged husband in Leavenworth.

The testimony followed the opening statements of attorneys in the case of Barbara M. Frantz.

Frantz, 52, Kansas City, Kansas, is charged in Leavenworth County District Court with first-degree murder.

She is accused of shooting her estranged husband, Gary, Jan. 27, 2017, in a parking lot outside of the Stove Factory Lofts in downtown Leavenworth.

In her opening statement Tuesday, Assistant County Attorney Katie Devlin said the victim had driven home the night of the shooting after volunteering for the Veterans of Foreign Wars. He parked his car and was walking to his apartment.

“But he was shot six times,” Devlin said.

Devlin said the evidence will show that the victim told residents of the apartment complex that his wife shot him, and he later identified his wife as the shooter to a police officer who responded to the scene.

Devlin told jurors that they would hear evidence indicating empty shell casings found at the scene of the shooting and one found in the defendant’s residence were fired from the same gun.

Angela Keck, an attorney for Frantz, began her opening statement by reading transcripts of 911 calls and other statements by witnesses who identified the shooter as a man.

“The reality of this case is that Barbara Frantz did not shoot her husband, Gary Frantz,” Keck said.

She said the evidence will show that Patrick Frantz, son of the victim and defendant, is the shooter.

Keck said a recording of comments made at the scene by the victim reveals that he first said “my boy” before talking about his wife.

She said the evidence would show that there had been virtually no investigation of the son as the possible shooter.

The trial may last a couple of weeks.

The trial began Monday, and that day was spent on jury selection.

On Tuesday morning, the judge took up a defense motion that sought to suppress a witness’ earlier in-court identification of the defendant as someone who was seen leaving the scene of the shooting.

District Judge Michael Gibbens denied the motion and ruled that the in-court identification is admissible.

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