Kansas gubernatorial candidate Kris Kobach picked up 34 additional primary votes in Leavenworth County from provisional ballots. And current Gov. Jeff Colyer picked up 25 votes from Leavenworth County provisional ballots.

Kansas gubernatorial candidate Kris Kobach picked up 34 additional primary votes in Leavenworth County from provisional ballots. And current Gov. Jeff Colyer picked up 25 votes from Leavenworth County provisional ballots.

County Clerk Janet Klasinski reviewed the impact of the provisional ballots Tuesday morning after the Board of County Canvassers voted to certify the results of last week’s primary election in Leavenworth County.

The certification of the Leavenworth County votes came several hours before Colyer conceded to Kobach in the tight race for the Republican nomination for governor.

Kobach currently serves as the Kansas secretary of state.

The primary election was Aug. 7. But for a week, the Republican primary race for governor had been considered too close to call.

As of 8:45 p.m. Tuesday, the website for the Kansas Secretary of State’s Office showed Kobach with 128,543 votes in the statewide tally. Colyer had 128,198 votes.

In Leavenworth County, Kobach received a total of 3,881 votes and Colyer received 2,591 votes, according to the results that were certified Tuesday.

Typically, the three county commissioners act as the Board of County Canvassers. Commissioner Bob Holland was absent Tuesday, so former Commissioner Clyde Graeber was appointed to serve in Holland’s place on the Board of County Canvassers.

County Administrator Mark Loughry said three members were required for the Board of County Canvassers.

Overall, the canvassers certified the votes from 11,677 ballots. Of those ballots, 7,662 were cast by Republican voters and 4,015 were cast by Democrats.

Klasinski said there were 209 provisional ballots in Leavenworth County as a result of the Aug. 7 election. But the county clerk recommended counting the votes from only 99 of the provisional ballots.

She recommended that the canvassers not qualify the remaining 110 provisional ballots.

Klasinski said her office reviewed each provisional ballot and followed state law.

She said the Board of Canvassers ultimately decide which provisional ballots to accept. And the board followed her recommendations.

Of the 110 provisional ballots that were not accepted, 65 of them were from Republicans or Democrats who wanted to vote on another party’s ballot or unaffiliated voters who would not declare a party the day of the election.

Another 45 provisional ballots were not accepted because they were completed by people who were not previously registered to vote in Leavenworth County. While their provisional ballots were not counted for the primary election, these people were able to fill out voter registration forms. And they will be able to vote in the next election.

Klasinski said the provisional ballots that were not counted will remain sealed and stored in a secure area.

“Everything is kept secured,” she said.

Noting the closeness of one of the primary races, Klasinski said, “There is an opportunity for a recount. There is an opportunity for litigation.”

After the Board of Canvassers accepted Klasinski’s recommendations, the 99 qualified provisional ballots were opened in the County Clerk’s Office and run through a scanner.

Klasinski then returned to the Board of Canvassers with the updated results. The board voted unanimously to certify the results.

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