When they met Tuesday, Leavenworth County commissioners certified the results from a recent Basehor-Linwood school bond election.

When they met Tuesday, Leavenworth County commissioners certified the results from a recent Basehor-Linwood school bond election.

But someone who was connected to the bond issue is asking for a recount.

Commissioners certified the election results while acting as the Board of County Canvassers.

Mail ballots were used in the school bond election. Voters were required to return their ballots by noon Thursday.

The $57.1 million bond issue had been divided into two questions on the ballot.

The first question proposed two new elementary schools and other facility improvements totaling $51.6 million.

This proposition was approved with 2,591 "yes" votes and 1,784 "no" votes, County Clerk Janet Klasinski said.

The second question proposed improvements for school athletic facilities totaling $5.5 million.

This question failed with 2,190 "no" votes and 2,187 "yes" votes.

"It was a three-vote difference," Klasinski said.

Despite the close vote for the second proposition, Klasinski said she was not recommending the county initiate a recount because she did not see manifest errors.

Basehor-Linwood Superintendent David Howard later said the Basehor-Linwood Board of Education cannot legally request a recount. But he said someone who served on a committee that supported the bond issue will be requesting a recount by hand of the votes for the $5.5 million athletic facilities proposal.

"The district can't request it, but a citizen can," he said.

County Commissioner Doug Smith asked Klasinski about the cost of a recount.

Klasinski said a bond or check will be required if a recount is requested. Klasinski said she will ask $1,200 from the person requesting the recount.

She said the recount has to be requested by 5 p.m. today. Her office then has five days to complete the recount.

Klasinski said she plans for the recount to take place Thursday.

"It has to be done by a special election board," she said.

Klasinski said she will bring in two boards for the hand count, and the ballots will be split between the two boards.

"I think this election proves that every vote counts," Klasinski said.

She said the election also showed that it is important to place ballots in the mail in a timely manner.

Klasinski said her office received 87 ballots that could not be counted because they arrived after the deadline.

In a mail ballot election, a ballot that arrives after the deadline cannot be counted regardless of the date of the postmark, she said.

Twitter: @LVTNewsJohnR