Jerald Gross teaches eighth-grade social studies at Richard W. Warren Middle School. He is a Warren Pioneer Mentor Coordinator and a Warren Pioneer Junior Guard Coordinator. In this Q5, he talks about the current history exhibit at the school.

Jerald Gross teaches eighth-grade social studies at Richard W. Warren Middle School. He is a Warren Pioneer Mentor Coordinator and a Warren Pioneer Junior Guard Coordinator. In this Q5, he talks about the current history exhibit at the school.


What are some of the documents and artifacts that are part of the Revolutionary War exhibit at Warren Middle School? What sort of reactions have you observed from students when viewing these objects from this turbulent period?
Artifacts include uniform buttons from the colonies, England and France; an SAR grave marker; a Tomahawk made in England; an ammunition pouch; eating utensils; Hessian, English and Patriot bayonets; Continental Army pay records and colonial money. 
Students and staff members have welcomed the display with historical intrigue.

What areas and sites throughout the country are they from and are most of them in museums or privately owned? Who organized and installed the artifacts? What partnership made it possible?
The artifacts come from a private collection and are from the early colonial time period in America, England, Germany and France.
The artifacts were organized and installed by a collector who wishes to remain anonymous whom I have known for almost 15 years.
These artifacts are from his private collection and he wants the collection to stand on its own and be less about him. 
This display is an expansion of a partnership made during the previous school year to further students’ learning opportunities.

What is the Kansas City Military Collectors Club’s goal in sending these artifacts out for students to see and learn about? As an eighth-grade social studies teacher, what are you hoping students will learn from viewing the artifacts from this war?
The Kansas City Military Collectors Club's goal is to create new friendships and encourage shared learning in the various fields of military history.  
As with any display that I have outside and inside my room, I hope that students will be able to tie these artifacts to our lessons and use them as a springboard into further historical inquiry. 
It's important to remember that we must learn from history or be condemned to repeat it. 

Why do you think it’s important for students to learn about history? Is this exhibit a more personal and direct way to show them what most have probably only read about in books? What artifact in this collection do you think has made the biggest impression on the students?
I've always believed that learning about history should involve many avenues and we shouldn't just limit our learning to books.
Each artifact in the display has been able to tell a story about the lives during the colonial time period.

What kinds of questions do the students ask when viewing the exhibition? What other wars and other important moments in history’s artifacts would you like to someday be able to display for students?
Students always ask, how was someone able to keep this artifact for so many years?
I hope to be able to get artifacts to supplement our lessons on the Industrial Revolution, Mexican War, Alamo, the Spanish American War and bring back our Civil War display from last year. 

— Rimsie McConiga