John Bennett is a member and de facto instructor of the Senior Citizens PC Users Group, which meets once a week at Kansas City Kansas Community College's Leavenworth Center.

John Bennett is a member and de facto instructor of the Senior Citizens PC Users Group, which meets once a week at Kansas City Kansas Community College's Leavenworth Center.
The class helps senior citizens become more familiar and comfortable with computer use and technology, which today are becoming almost inescapable.
Bennett tells the Leavenworth Times more about the group, which is open to anyone, in this Q5.

John, when did you first attend the Senior Citizens PC Users Group at Kansas City Kansas Community College Leavenworth Center and what motivated you to become part of the group?
"I was attending the group when it was in Lansing, however, there wasn't sufficient room for the group there. So, I followed it to KCKCC. That was somewhere around 10 years ago."

Is this a great way for seniors who feel intimidated by technology to learn how to use PCs to feel more connected and in touch with their community and world?
"No one should feel intimidated, just willing to do a little practice each week on their own, and to return enough times to become somewhat efficient. Most folks, even without previous experience, can reach that initial goal in 15 visits to the group.   Some familiarity with a typewriter will be of benefit for those who know nothing about a  computer."

What are the most important things this instructional time has taught you over the years that have broadened your PC abilities and enabled you to explore the Internet and social networks in greater depth?
"Perhaps the most important thing I have learned is that almost anyone can learn how to use a computer, if they have the initiative to stick with it for several weeks.
All of us have contact with computers these days, even gassing up a vehicle requires some basic skills — reading and touching.
"A fun aspect occurs when an older person gains the ability to send and receive email with their family."

What have been the biggest hurdles for people in your group in learning to triumph over particular tech challenges that PCs sometimes present?
"No one is too old to learn to use a computer.
“We've had several people in their 90s come to the class. Biggest hurdle is to break them away from copying what they have written back onto a sheet of paper with a pen, or typewriter."

What tech mountains do you plan to tackle next? The wearable eyeglasses computer called Google Glass is now available. Will we someday see you around town wearing this device?
"We instruct students in 'what they want to know,' not what we think they should know. It is delivered informally and we have students help newer students if they can.
“The best way to learn is to teach someone else how to do it. There are no mountains, and yes, we'll see people using the newest technologies soon after they become mainstream."