The director of Leavenworth County Emergency Management said a software glitch is believed to be the reason outdoor warning sirens did not initially work Thursday during a tornado warning.

The director of Leavenworth County Emergency Management said a software glitch is believed to be the reason outdoor warning sirens did not initially work Thursday during a tornado warning.

Chuck Magaha said Friday that his department is changing its operations to prevent the problem from happening again.

Magaha followed the procedure he has used in the past for activating the sirens three times Thursday. The problems were experienced during the first attempt, which occurred at 3:34 p.m.

They were activated again at 4:02 p.m. when the tornado warning was extended. This time the sirens worked.

The sirens were successfully activated again at 4:17 p.m. This time, only sirens in Leavenworth and Lansing were activated because of the location of the threat.

Magaha said a contractor looked at the system Friday afternoon. It is believed the glitch caused a data stream to become scrambled during the first activation attempt Thursday, causing the sirens not to sound.

"Our siren system is mechanical device," Magaha said.

He said they are activated on monthly basis for testing purposes. The system communicates with the individual sirens each morning to check for possible problems.

Magaha said the sirens are intended to be a warning system for only people who are outside at the time of severe weather.

He also said the sirens are never activated in order to sound an all clear. He said the sirens are sounded to alert people to threats.

Magaha said there are a variety of other tools that alert people to tornado threats including computer apps for mobile devices, all hazard weather radios and local news stations.

"We need people to rely on multiple resources," he said.

Twitter: @LVTNewsJohnR