The attorney for a man accused of attempting to kill an employee at a Leavenworth halfway house plans to argue that his client did not have the necessary mental capacity to be held responsible for intentionally committing the crime.

The attorney for a man accused of attempting to kill an employee at a Leavenworth halfway house plans to argue that his client did not have the necessary mental capacity to be held responsible for intentionally committing the crime.

Cameron J. Walton, 36, appeared Friday in Leavenworth County District Court with his attorney, John Bryant.

Walton is charged with attempted second-degree murder. The charge stems from a Dec. 13, 2016, incident at the Grossman Center in Leavenworth.

The Grossman Center is a re-entry facility for inmates who are completing their sentences.

Walton is accused of attacking an employee at the facility. The incident was reported the day Walton was supposed to be released from the center.

In court Friday, Bryant said Assistant County Attorney Megan Williams had raised concerns about portions of a report from a defense expert, Dr. Robert Barnett.

Bryant said Barnett, who evaluated Walton, determined the defendant did not have the culpable mental state to be convicted of an intentional act.

Williams expressed concern that statements Walton made to Barnett, which she characterized as self-serving, would be considered hearsay at trial unless the defendant testifies and is cross examined.

Bryant argued that Barnett has to be able to testify about what Walton told him during an interview in order to show a basis for how the doctor rendered his opinion.

Williams requested time to prepare a written brief on the issue.

District Judge Michael Gibbens scheduled a hearing for Jan. 2 to take up pretrial motions.

The case is scheduled to go to trial Jan. 7.

Walton remains in custody at the Leavenworth County Jail.

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