It would probably cost close to $120 million to pave all of the gravel roads in Leavenworth County, the county administrator said.

It would probably cost close to $120 million to pave all of the gravel roads in Leavenworth County, the county administrator said.

“We don’t have those kinds of funds,” County Administrator Mark Loughry said.

He said county officials will prioritize roads for paving based on traffic counts.

“We will try to pave as many roads as we can,” Loughry said.

But he said it is unlikely people who live on gravel roads with low traffic counts will have their roads paved anytime soon.

Loughry’s comments came Wednesday during a work session of the Leavenworth County Commission.

Commissioners discussed the county’s dust abatement program.

Public Works Director David Lutgen said county officials are using a pave-in-place program. He said this will allow gravel roads to be paved at a lower cost than fully engineered roads.

He said deficiencies that exist after a road is paved in place can be addressed by signage.

Loughry said safety is addressed through the signage.

“We don’t build unsafe roads,” he said.

Commissioners asked Public Works Department staff about two recent projects that paved sections of 179th and 182nd streets.

According to Lutgen, a contractor was hired for these projects. County officials have not yet accepted these roads as being completed.

Even though the roads have been paved, they are rougher than county officials would like. Lutgen said county officials are waiting for the problems to be fixed before the roads are accepted.

Loughry said county officials probably need to tighten specifications for future projects and may need to do more inspections.

Members of the public filled the commission meeting room for Wednesday’s meeting. Several audience members addressed commissioners about specific roads.

Leavenworth County has more than 400 miles of gravel roads.

Under the best case scenario, the county could pave each road at $200,000 per mile, which would cost a total of $80 million to pave all of the gravel roads, Loughry said.

But he said the real cost probably would be closer to $120 million.

Commissioner Jeff Culbertson, who joined the commission this week, said he would like for the county to pave more roads during the next four years than the past 20 years.

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