An Army officer assigned to the Command and General Staff Officers Course died Tuesday at Fort Leavenworth, according to a news release from the fort.

An Army officer assigned to the Command and General Staff Officers Course died Tuesday at Fort Leavenworth, according to a news release from the fort.

Maj. Levi D. Hazlett, student at CGSC and a career Army artillery officer, was found unresponsive after collapsing in his on-post residence and was transported by the Fort Leavenworth Fire Department to Saint Luke’s Cushing Hospital. He was pronounced dead at the hospital.

The death is under investigation by special agents from the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command. According to Chris Grey, spokesman for the command, foul play is not suspected at this point in the investigation.

“The soldiers, families and friends of the Command and General Staff College are deeply saddened by the loss of Capt. Levi D. Hazlett,” Brig. Gen. Troy D. Galloway, deputy commandant of the CGSC, said in the news release. “Our Army is only as great as the soldiers and families who comprise it. When we lose one of our fine officers, it strikes at the heart of the entire formation. But what’s more heartbreaking are the loved ones left in the wake of this tragedy. Our sincerest condolences go out to his family whom we’ll continue to support as they move through this difficult time.”

Hazlett, a native of California, was commissioned an Army officer in 2008 following graduation from the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York. He was 37, according to the release from the headquarters for the Combined Arms Center and Fort Leavenworth.

Hazlett’s awards include the Bronze Star Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, Army Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal, Army Valorous Unit Citation, Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal, Iraq Campaign Medal, Global War on Terrorism Campaign Medal, Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon, NATO Medal and Parachute Qualification Badge.

Hazlett had been scheduled to be promoted from the rank of captain to major April 1. But the Army has posthumously promoted him to major, according to Scott Gibson, deputy public affairs officer for the Combined Arms Center.