A survey of 2018 Lansing High School graduates shows a majority of the respondents feel the school district prepared them for their current endeavors.

A survey of 2018 Lansing High School graduates shows a majority of the respondents feel the school district prepared them for their current endeavors.

Lansing Superintendent Darrel Stufflebeam said the results of a first-year alumni survey were reviewed Monday during a meeting of the Lansing Board of Education.

Stufflebeam said conducting the survey had been a goal of the board members.

Sixty-one Lansing High School graduates from the class of 2018 responded to the survey, which was a return rate of 28%, according to survey results.

One of the questions on the survey asked the former students to respond to a statement that the Lansing school district and Lansing High School had “prepared me well for my current pursuits.”

Eleven former students, or 18.03% of the respondents, indicated they strongly agree with the statement. And 23 former students, or 37.7%, indicated they agree with the statement.

“I was grateful to see a large number agreed or strongly agreed,” Stufflebeam said.

Ten former students, or 16.39%, indicated they had neutral feelings about the statement. Twelve, or 19.67%, disagreed with the statement. And five, or 8.2%, strongly disagreed.

Another question asked the Lansing High School graduates about their employment status.

Forty-one, or 71.93%, indicated they are full-time students. Eight, or 14.04%, indicated they are working full-time. And another eight indicated they are working part-time and going to school on a part-time basis. Four of the respondents did not answer this question.

Stufflebeam said the survey also had a comment box.

“I talked about the themes of their comments (with board members),” Stufflebeam said.

He some of the comments concerned a change in homework policy and adding more vocational opportunities. He said these two items already have been addressed.

Other comments recommend that the district focus on helping students learn independent living skills and personal finance skills.

“It wasn’t necessarily things they needed for college,” Stufflebeam said. “It was things they needed for their personal lives.”

He said this “is going to be a discussion topic for us.”

Twitter: @LVTNewsJohnR