Data from a recently released database regarding pain pills in the United States may be deceiving when it comes to Leavenworth County.

Data from a recently released database regarding pain pills in the United States may be deceiving when it comes to Leavenworth County.

The Washington Post recently published the data that had been obtained from the Drug Enforcement Administration. The database indicates Leavenworth County had one of the highest concentrations of oxycodone and hydrocodone pills in the United States between the years 2006 and 2012. But about 89% of the pills sent to Leavenworth County during this period went to the Department of Veterans Consolidated Mail Outpatient Pharmacy.

Information that appears with a story on the Washington Post’s website indicates that prescription pain pills distributed to Leavenworth County between 2006 and 2012 averaged to 226.5 pills per person per year.

However, the CMOP facility in the city of Leavenworth, which received the bulk of the pills, ships prescriptions to other locations in the United States for the VA system.

According to the published data, there were 118 million prescription pain pills supplied to Leavenworth County during that period. And 105 million of them went to the CMOP facility.

By contrast, the pharmacy in Leavenworth County that received second largest amount of prescription pain pills during the same period was CVS, which received 2.4 million pills, according to the published data.

David Van Parys, senior county counselor for Leavenworth County, said in an email that he had received information Thursday afternoon from the director of the Leavenworth County Health Department. Van Parys said the information explained the CMOP’s impact on the average number of pills per person in the county.

Van Parys likened the situation to “saying that everyone in Detroit purchased 10 cars per year.”

While the prescription painkiller problem may not be as bad as it appears from the database, Leavenworth County recently joined the large list of government entities from around the country that are suing opioid manufacturers and distributors.

The suit, which was filed last month in U.S. District Court on behalf of the Leavenworth County Commission, argues that opioid addiction has resulted in a “hazard to public health and safety.”

Twitter: @LVTNewsJohnR