The Missouri River is no longer flooded in the Leavenworth area. But the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plans to continue to release high levels of water from a dam located upriver.

The Missouri River is no longer flooded in the Leavenworth area. But the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plans to continue to release high levels of water from a dam located upriver.

The Northwestern Division of the Army Corps of Engineers announced last week that water was being released from Gavins Point Dam, located near Yankton, South Dakota, at a rate of 70,000 cubic feet per second. This is nearly twice the average release rate for this time of year.

“We will maintain Gavins Point releases at this rate to continue evacuating water from the Missouri River mainstem reservoir system,” John Remus, chief of the Corps’ Missouri River Basin Water Management Division, said in a news release.

Water releases from Gavins Point are expected to remain above average through the remainder of the summer and into the fall.

This comes after heavy rainfall during the month of July resulted in above average runoff in the upper Missouri River basin. The upper Missouri River basin is located north of Sioux City, Iowa.

The total 2019 runoff forecast for the upper Missouri River basin is 52.9 million acre feet. If this forecast holds true, 2019 will have the second highest runoff in 121 years of record keeping, according to the Army Corps of Engineers.

The Missouri River has flooded several times this year in the Leavenworth area. The river reaches its flood stage for the area at a depth of 20 feet.

On March 23, the river reached 31.3 feet. This marked the second worst flood on record for the city of Leavenworth, according to the National Weather Service.

On June 1, the river reached 28.6 feet. This was the fourth worst flood on record for Leavenworth.

As of 2 p.m. Monday, the river was at a depth of 14.65 feet. There currently is no forecast of flooding for the Leavenworth area.

But Chuck Magaha, director of Leavenworth County Emergency Management, said he is not letting his guard down when it comes to the Missouri River.

“We monitor it on a regular basis,” he said.

Twitter: @LVTNewsJohnR