The Missouri River is under a flood warning in the Leavenworth area. And the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced this week that water likely will continue to be released from dams into the river at high levels through the fall and into the winter.

Updated 1:47 p.m. Oct. 14, 2019, to correct the minimum flood stage level.

The Missouri River is under a flood warning in the Leavenworth area. And the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced this week that water likely will continue to be released from dams into the river at high levels through the fall and into the winter.

After being on the rise for several days, the river appeared to have crested Friday in the Leavenworth area at 22.69 feet, according to the National Weather Service.

The river reaches flood stage for the area at a depth of 20 feet.

Forecasters predict the floodwaters will recede over the next several days, and the river will drop below flood stage next week, according to the NWS.

Chuck Magaha, director of Leavenworth County Emergency Management, believes the river will remain at a high depth level even after it drops out of its flood stage.

“It will stay swollen for many weeks ahead,” he said.

Heavy and widespread rain in the upper Missouri River basin resulted in above average runoff for the month of September, according to a news release from the Northwestern Division of the Army Corps of Engineers.

Precipitation was 200% more than normal in eastern Montana, much of North Dakota, portions of South Dakota and northern Nebraska.

Even though the river is going down in the Leavenworth area, water is being released upriver at high levels from Gavins Point Dam near Yankton, South Dakota, and other dams along the river.

“In response to the increased upstream runoff, releases from Gavins Point Dam have been increased to 80,000 (cubic feet per second),” John Remus, chief of the Army Corps of Engineers Missouri River Basin Water Management Division, said in a news release. “This release rate is more than twice the average release for this time of the year.”

Remus said releases from dams likely will remain above average through November in order to empty stored flood water from reservoirs.

“Failure to evacuate the stored flood water will lead to increased risk of flooding in 2020,” Remus said in a news release.

Magaha said Leavenworth County Emergency Management will continue to monitor the Missouri River.

Twitter: @LVTNewsJohnR