Car crashes involving deer tend to increase this time of year. And local law enforcement officers are offering tips to help motorists avoid accidents.

Car crashes involving deer tend to increase this time of year. And local law enforcement officers are offering tips to help motorists avoid accidents.

“It’s always important to drive the speed limit,” said Maj. Dan Nicodemus, deputy chief of the Leavenworth Police Department.

He said traveling the speed limit will give drivers a chance to avoid objects in the roadway whether they are deer or other vehicles.

Leavenworth County Undersheriff Jim Sherley recommends driving more cautiously and leaving earlier than normal to allow more time to reach destinations.

He also recommends paying attention to signs denoting traditional deer crossing areas.

Nicodemus said the sight of one deer crossing a roadway may be an indication there are more in the area. He suggests looking for others.

Sherley also recommends that people avoid texting and other distractions while they are driving. He said avoiding distractions will increase the likelihood of being able to avoid deer accidents.

The undersheriff said there may be times when striking a deer in the roadway is better than swerving to miss the animal. He said people sometimes attempt an aggressive maneuver to avoid hitting deer and their vehicles end up going off the road.

“That can sometimes be more serious,” he said.

Sherley also recommends wearing seat belts.

Sherley said people who are involved in car-deer accidents should remain at the scene and contact law enforcement.

Deer typically are on the move more this time of year because of their mating season. Deer also are seeking new food sources and shelter this time of year as crops are being harvested and leaves fall from trees and shrubs, according to a news release from the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism.

Car-deer crashes tend to peak in mid-November. That is when the rut, or deer mating season, peaks.

“Wet weather this year may cause some deer to cross roads in new places and the additional vegetation growth could make deer harder to see until they are in the road,” Levi Jaster, Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism big game coordinator, said in a news release. “The approaching breeding season increases deer movement, and the cooler weather, along with young deer dispersing to find new home ranges, mean more deer may be crossing the roads.”

Twitter: @LVTNewsJohnR