The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has cut back the amount of water being released from dams along the Missouri River.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has cut back the amount of water being released from dams along the Missouri River.

Locally, officials continue to monitor the river following significant flooding earlier in the year.

The Army Corps of Engineers began reducing the amount of water being released from dams Nov. 20. The dams are located upriver from Leavenworth.

"Overall releases from the Missouri River system will still be higher than normal through the winter to ensure flood control zones are emptied before the next runoff season," John Remus, chief of the Army Corps of Engineers' Missouri River Water Management Division, said in a news release. "We are continuing to monitor conditions and will make adjustments as necessary."

At 2 p.m. Friday, the Missouri River was at a depth of 14.72 feet in the Leavenworth area. This is about 2.25 feet below what is referred to as the river's action stage for this area.

Even though the Missouri River is no longer flooded, Kim Buchanan, deputy director of Leavenworth County Emergency Management, said the river may still be high when spring arrives next year.

"We just kind of start spring already full," she said.

This past spring saw the second-worst flood on record for the Leavenworth area.

On March 23, the river reached 31.3 feet. The river reaches its flood stage at 20 feet.

The river flooded several more times during the year. On June 1, the river reached 28.66 feet, which was the fourth-worst flood on record for the Leavenworth area.

Buchanan said levees in Leavenworth County that were damaged during this year's flooding have not yet been repaired.

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