The Shawnee County Commission on Monday will consider a proposal that would revise its chain of command regarding its response to the COVID-19 crisis.


That proposal is among items on the agenda when commissioners meet at 9 a.m. Monday in their chambers in Room B-11 of the County Courthouse, 200 S.E. 7th.


The Topeka City Council will then meet at 6 p.m. Tuesday in its chambers at 214 S.E. 8th.


Monday’s commission meeting will be closed to the public but will be aired live on the county’s website at www.snco.us.


Commissioners ask that anyone with comments about anything on Monday’s agenda email them at commission@snco.us.


The agenda for Monday’s meeting includes a proposed resolution that would:


• Arrange for county Emergency Management director Dusty Nichols to become incident commander for the county’s COVID-19 response, with City of Topeka media relations director Molly Hadfield assuming Nichols’ role as lead public information officer for that response.


• Appoint Errin Mahan, planning section chief for Shawnee County Emergency Management, as that department’s interim director, in a move aimed at enabling the county to effectively respond to any other types of disasters that might occur during the COVID-19 crisis, such as floods or tornadoes.


• Arrange for Shawnee County Health Department director Linda Ochs to assume the role of "operations section chief" for the COVID-19 response while focusing on health department issues as well as that response.


Tuesday’s council meeting will also be closed to the public, though residents may watch it live on the City of Topeka’s Facebook page, the city’s website at www.topeka.org or CIty4, the city’s cable TV station.


Anyone with comments about anything on Tuesday’s agenda is asked to email them to cclerk@topeka.org.


The mayor and council will hear a report Tuesday from county public health officer Gianfranco Pezzino.


They will also consider annexing 29 acres of land at 2030 S.E. 41st into the city at the request of its owner, the Kansas District of the Wesleyan Church, and changing zoning to allow that land to be developed as a two-lot subdivision, with plans calling for a church to be built on one lot and the other to be used for church-related outdoor activities.