While it was scaled back this year because of the coronavirus pandemic, representatives of the Lansing Educational Foundation still managed to conduct their annual Pride Patrol to recognize grant recipients.


"It was low key this year," said Sharon Burns, director of the foundation.


In the past, representatives of the foundation toured the school buildings for the Pride Patrol with balloons and accompanied by cheerleaders and the school mascot.


This year, the size of the group was limited because of concerns about spreading the coronavirus.


Burns said school administrators were still supportive of having the Pride Patrol. And representatives of the foundation still presented grant recipients with oversized checks.


The presentations took place last week.


The foundation has awarded more than $46,000 in grants this school year.


According to Burns, the foundation awarded 23 of what are known as Educate the Pride grants to teachers.


The largest of these grants, which was for nearly $5,000, was presented to Anne Krebs, a robotics teacher at Lansing High School.


The grant money will be used to purchase supplies for a new robotics class.


"Students in the high school’s robotics course have already learned to build a basic robot and program simple movements," Krebs said in a news release."Perhaps most important, those same students regularly have to troubleshoot issues with robot programming and structure when the machines don’t perform as expected."


The foundation also has awarded Mary Kay Pape musical grants, Ted LoPresti Memorial grants and grants for autism programs.


The foundation also awarded building grants, which Burns said were presented to building administrators.


The grant presentations came after the foundation canceled fundraising events in the spring and fall including a gala that serves as the organization’s largest fundraiser.


Burns said she will have a virtual kickoff for the foundation’s annual fundraising campaign next week.


Twitter: @LVTNewsJohnR