To the editor:


Marilyn Pittman is indignant about what she sees one-sidedly as alleged Republican "toxicity" in campaigning. In her pleading for "civility," she fails to look over her shoulder at the fine examples "at the top" of the Democratic Party in Sen. Chuck Schumer and Rep. Nancy Pelosi and their daily libelous and slanderous diatribes against Republicans and everything conservative.


Ms. Pittman claims that "the attitude is to say anything and everything negative about your opponent whether it is true or not." While preaching that we "all be more tolerant," she does not hesitate to state that "Trump has no moral values (and that) his god is power and money."


She berates Mr. David French and Mr. Kevin Braun, both of whom have run positive campaigns, for their alleged refusing to "vote for Medicaid ever." Apparently, in her view, they are not entitled to a position on the issue. (But, of course, her son is entitled to his firm position relative to advocating abortion). She then insinuates that French and Braun are somehow unworthy of taxpayer-funded medical care after having earned it from serving faithfully in their lengthy military careers.


I challenge Ms. Pittman to show where the U.S. Constitution mentions a separation of church and state.


She mistakenly argues that religious clergy cannot "present their personal opinions for whom to vote in a sermon," and that "political material should not be distributed on church property, including church-owned or leased parking areas." Please show us under which article in the Constitution these words appear? I observed that it did not prevent her son from campaigning uninvited in the lobby of my church at the close of services one Sunday.